• 1

Current Headlines

  • NAFSA: Recent CFPB action could set dangerous precedent

    WASHINGTON – A recent Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) action is deeply troubling for tribal sovereignty and tribal economic development, according to the Native American Financial Services Association (NAFSA) and a wide array of American Indian and Alaska Native organizations and tribes. The group recently sent a letter to CFPB Director

    Read More
  • Event focus on keeping moccasin-making tradition alive

    GALLUP, N.M. (AP) – For Donnaleigh Dedman, the room of Navajo moccasin-makers represented a return to self-sufficiency and being self-sustaining. "I like this room of Navajo people making moccasins," Dedman said Nov. 8. "This is what it should be like. Not us running into town to buy moccasins from the white

    Read More
  • Winnebago Tribe makes move to take over troubled hospital

    WINNEBAGO, Neb. (AP) – The Winnebago Tribal Council has taken steps to take over management of a hospital on a Native American reservation in northeastern Nebraska. The Sioux City Journal reports that the council voted last week to initiate the process of taking control of the Omaha Winnebago Hospital. The tribe

    Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29

Featured Job Listings

  • #2017-14016 Patient Benefit Coordinator

    Cherokee Nation, whose headquarters are located in beautiful Tahlequah, Oklahoma, is a national leader in Indian tribal governments and economic development. We are a dynamic, progressive organization, which owns several business enterprises and administers a variety of services for the Cherokee people in Northeastern Oklahoma. Cherokee Nation offers an exceptional

    Read More
  • #2017-14027 RN MED-SURG

    Cherokee Nation, whose headquarters are located in beautiful Tahlequah, Oklahoma, is a national leader in Indian tribal governments and economic development. We are a dynamic, progressive organization, which owns several business enterprises and administers a variety of services for the Cherokee people in Northeastern Oklahoma. Cherokee Nation offers an exceptional

    Read More
  • #2017-14017 Inpatient RN

    Cherokee Nation, whose headquarters are located in beautiful Tahlequah, Oklahoma, is a national leader in Indian tribal governments and economic development. We are a dynamic, progressive organization, which owns several business enterprises and administers a variety of services for the Cherokee people in Northeastern Oklahoma. Cherokee Nation offers an exceptional

    Read More
  • American Indian Studies Faculty

    The Pawnee Nation College is accepting applications for American Indian Studies Faculty. Applicants must have a Master's degree in the field. If interested, you may find an application on the website at www.pawneenationcollege.org or call 918-762-3343 for more information. The Pawnee Nation College (PNC), founded in 2004, began offering general

    Read More
  • Financial Accounting Faculty

    The Pawnee Nation College is accepting applications for Introductory Financial Accounting Faculty. Applicants must have a Master's degree in the field. If interested, you may find an application on the website at www.pawneenationcollege.org or call 918-762-3343 for more information. The Pawnee Nation College (PNC), founded in 2004, began offering general

    Read More
  • Introductory Algebra & College Algebra Faculty

    The Pawnee Nation College is accepting applications for Introductory Algebra and College Algebra Faculty. Applicants must have a Master's degree in the field. If interested, you may find an application on the website at www.pawneenationcollege.org or call 918-762-3343 for more information. The Pawnee Nation College (PNC), founded in 2004, began

    Read More
  • English Composition I & II Faculty

    The Pawnee Nation College is accepting applications for English Composition I & II Faculty. Applicants must have a Master's degree in the field. If interested, you may find an application on the website at www.pawneenationcollege.org or call 918-762-3343 for more information. The Pawnee Nation College (PNC), founded in 2004, began

    Read More
  • Early Childhood Education Instructor

    The Pawnee Nation College is accepting applications for an Early Childhood Education Instructor. Applicants must have a Master's degree in the field. If interested, you may find an application on the website at www.pawneenationcollege.org or call 918-762-3343 for more information. The Pawnee Nation College (PNC), founded in 2004, began offering

    Read More
  • Assistant Professor | Landscape Architecture Program

    The South Dakota State University Landscape Architecture Program invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professor position to begin August 2018. Responsibilities include teaching courses within the professional curriculum, developing and carrying out an agenda of creative work and research, providing service to the discipline, university and community, and teaching in

    Read More
  • In-House Staff Attorney

    The Snoqualmie Indian Tribe is seeking experienced candidates for an In-House Staff Attorney. This position provides legal advice, representation, and services regarding a broad range of matters arising in the operation of the Snoqualmie Tribal Government and its various departments. - Juris Doctorate from an A.B.A. accredited law school required. - At

    Read More
  • 1
  • 2

WETUMPKA, Ala. – As of Tuesday afternoon, Wayland Gray is a free man.

Gray, a citizen of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, was arrested Friday afternoon for trespassing and allegedly making a terrorist threat against the Wind Creek Casino and its management. Gray and a group from both the Muscogee (Creek) and Poarch Band of Creek Indians had attempted to pray for their ancestors once buried at the casino construction site, which overlaps with Hickory Ground, a pre-removal burial ground, capitol and sacred site.

Detained over President’s Day weekend in the Elmore County, Ala., jail, Gray was released Tuesday afternoon after Muscogee (Creek) Nation Principal Chief George Tiger and other tribal officials traveled to Alabama to negotiate a lower bond. Originally held for a $30,000 cash-only bond, Gray was released for $15,000 late Tuesday afternoon and flew back to Oklahoma with Tiger.

“I came because the families of Wayland Gray and our tribal members felt that this is something the nation needed to do,” Tiger said at a press conference Tuesday in Montgomery, Ala. “I want to be able to take Mr. Gray home this evening to his parents and loved ones. It is our hope that one day our relatives in this state…can work together with us.”          

Brendan Ludwick, attorney for the Hickory Ground Tribal Town, said Gray and the three other men arrested Friday will challenge the arrest under the American Indian Religious Freedom Act.

Despite the excavation of 57 sets of human remains, Poarch Band officials maintain that the $246 million casino expansion project does not violate any potentially applicable federal laws, including the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. The land, which has been held in trust since 1984, is part of the Alabama tribe’s reservation and is on the National Register of Historic Places.

The casino, along with the tribe’s two other gaming facilities in Montgomery, Ala., and Atmore, Ala., is also the subject of a lawsuit filed Tuesday morning by Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange. Citing state laws that prohibit slot machine gaming, Strange filed the suit in the Elmore County Circuit Court against the Poarch Band of Creek Indians’ gaming authority and the individual members of the gaming authority and tribal council in their official capacity.  The three casinos have a combined 2,500 electronic games.

 


 

 

Creek protestor faces federal charges on alleged terrorist threat

 

WETUMPKA, Ala. – What started out as a peaceful attempt to pray at a sacred site last week has ended in four arrests – and one charge of allegedly uttering a terrorist threat.

Four men were arrested Feb. 15 for trespassing after trying to lead a prayer service at a controversial casino expansion project.

Along with several citizens of the Poarch Band of Creek Indians, members of the Hickory Ground Tribal Town in Oklahoma, part of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, traveled to the expansion site of the PBCI’s Wind Creek Casino to conduct a ceremony in honor of their ancestors who were once buried there.  The group had requested the construction be halted a day to allow the group to conduct the prayer ceremony without interruption, but was denied by Poarch Band officials. The four were arrested after they walked onto the casino property.

Hickory Ground Tribal Town members Mike Harjo and Michael Deo, along with a Cherokee man who only publicly identified himself with a nickname, were released from the Elmore County, Ala., jail by 4:30 p.m. Friday.

A fourth protestor, Hickory Ground Tribal Town member Wayland Gray, was detained due to additional allegations from PBCI officials that he made terrorist threats against the facility and its management. He is being held on a $30,000 cash only bond.

Brendan Ludwick, legal counsel for the Tribal Town, told Native Times that Gray’s alleged  threat was something he said while being arrested. According to Ludwick, Gray told officers that ‘he would be back to pray for his ancestors after this place (the casino) was torn down,’ referring to a federal lawsuit filed in December against the tribe to halt construction at the site.

The charge of a making a terrorist threat is a felony. The earliest Gray can expect an arraignment hearing is Tuesday, Feb. 19.

“The Poarch Band of Creek Indians is using post 9/11 hysteria to deprive my client of his First Amendment Right to free speech and religious expression,” Ludwick said.

The group was also turned away from the property the day before by tribal police officers and a representative from the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

“It is mind-boggling that they are alleging these charges against someone who was praying for his excavated ancestors at a ceremonial ground,” Ludwick said. “They are attempting to use their influence over the local government to punish Wayland, but they are only going to bring greater awareness to the sacred lands and religious freedom issues there.

The casino construction project has come under fire from the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, along with traditionalists in Alabama, for its potential desecration of a pre-removal sacred site and burial ground. A federal lawsuit to stop the $246 million expansion is pending in the Middle District of Alabama.

The plaintiffs claim that 57 sets of human remains of their ancestors were excavated from Hickory Ground in violation of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA).

Ludwick said any charges filed against the four men would be challenged under the American Indian Religious Freedom Act.

A representative for the PBCI said they could not suspend the construction or allow the group onto the site due to safety issues and the ongoing litigation.


An online campaign is actively trying to raise money for Gray’s bond. For more information see www.facebook.com/SaveHickoryGround or the Free Wayland Gray campaign on indiegogo at http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/339539/x/1002311?show_todos=true

Wayland Gray, seen here in this Feb. 9 file photo, is being held on a $30 thousand cash only bond in the Elmore County, Ala., jail on alleged terrorist threat charges.